Experts in Sterile Compounded Solutions
JCB is registered with the FDA as a 503B Outsourcing Facility. Registration with the Food and Drug Administration for compounding pharmacies is voluntary and all registered facilities are subject to FDA inspections.

JCB Labs Blog

Consolidating Standing Orders in an Ophthalmic Surgery Center

Posted By Greg Rockers on Wed, Oct 29, 2014 @ 16:10 PM

I could have also given this blog the title, “Help, I am a consultant pharmacist and I have a director of nursing that is going crazy trying to keep up with a group of surgeons who each want a different pre-op standing order for cataract surgeries!”

I speak to nurses at surgery centers every day. A common topic of conversation is the issues that can arise when every surgeon wants a different regimen of pre-op dilating and numbing drops prior to a cataract procedure. Most understand  why a physician wants to stick with his/her protocol.  It works for them and this is the way they have been doing it for years! However, in today’s ambulatory surgery center (ASC) world, where reimbursement continues to shrink, surveyors are vigilant and lawsuits are not uncommon, finding ways to increase efficiency, lower costs and reduce risk is critical.  

This brings me back to the consultant pharmacist.  The nurse in question had a great consultant pharmacist who was ready and willing to help her tackle this problem. When the pharmacist offered to help, the nurse handed the consultant 30 pages of standing orders. Both realized that this situation was untenable.  The facility was wasting valuable nursing time trying to find the correct meds for the different orders, spending 30 to 45 minutes giving a series of 3-4 individual drops up to 3 different times and the rate of medication wastage was high.  Additionally, there was a real fear  that a medication mix-up was inevitable.  

The nurse and the pharmacist got together and committed to fixing this problem. They went through each order and found that, from a clinical perspective, there really was not significant differences in the vast majority of the orders. They decided to call their compounding pharmacy to find a combination ophthalmic drop that would work for most of their surgeons, and present it at the next meeting.

It took a little convincing but the proof was in the results. Having just one or two different pre-op eye drop combinations allowed the facility to streamline the medication ordering and administration process.  The surgeons got the results they wanted and the nurses were able to shave almost 30 minutes off of their normal pre-op time.  This also made the surgeons happy because the shorter pre-op time allowed them to schedule more cases per day.

Change can be challenging for everyone.  In this case, the nurse and pharmacist had good data that showed their proposal would result in therapy that was safer, more efficient and cost effective.  This was a winning solution for everyone - physician, nurse, patient and facility!

Tag: combination, compounding, cataract, surgeries, dilating, ASC,